The kids are alright

By Nancy Gardner

The  Voice editor

The City of Seattle’s new Navigation Center for the homeless, opening this summer, got some landscaping assistance from 55 rescue goats in early June.

Tammy Dunakin, chief goat wrangler and owner of Rent-A-Ruminant, spent several days at the Center, where her crew ate its way through about one quarter of an acre of brush, blackberries, ivy and other tasty goat fare.

Houston, far left, greets a visitor as Rue, center, looks on. Juveniles are called kids, and  females are referred to as does or nannies. Males are called bucks or billies. These rescue goats have devoured unwanted weeds located at Seattle’s Navigation Center, which opens soon. Known for their calming demeanor, goats were used as companions for high-strung racehorses. Stableboys who stole goats before races did so to upset their competitors, causing them to lose. The phrase, “I’m going to get your goat,” thus refers to angering or annoying one’s rival.

Houston, far left, greets a visitor as Rue, center, looks on. Juveniles are called kids, and females are referred to as does or nannies. Males are called bucks or billies. These rescue goats have devoured unwanted weeds located at Seattle’s Navigation Center, which opens soon. Known for their calming demeanor, goats were used as companions for high-strung racehorses. Stableboys who stole goats before races did so to upset their competitors, causing them to lose. The phrase, “I’m going to get your goat,” thus refers to angering or annoying one’s rival.

“Cities like ours that are supportive of green initiatives understand the value that companies like mine provide,” Dunakin says. “Goats can reach steep slopes where machinery and people often can’t, and they work continuously and don’t contribute to noise or air pollution the way heavy equipment can.”

 

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