UW and SHA team up to build affordable housing in the University District

Written by on October 1, 2017 in Local and National News, Seattle Housing Authority - Comments Off

By Seattle Housing Authority

The University of Washington and the Seattle Housing Authority have signed a memorandum of understanding for the two organizations to develop affordable housing in the University District.

The goal is to create a minimum of 150 affordable units that will be income restricted to those making 60 percent or less of area median income. Units will be offered first to University faculty and staff who meet income requirements before being made available to the general public under the same income requirements.

The project will also include housing and services for homeless young adults, and possibly other services such as childcare.

“At the UW, we’re part of this community, and we see what Seattle’s growth has done to rents and mortgages. This partnership creates the opportunity to provide a new, affordable option to UW employees who could otherwise be priced out of living near where they work. It’s an expansion of our commitment to our employees, but it’s also the right thing to do for them and for the city we all call home,” said UW President Ana Mari Cauce.
“This project represents a significant contribution to two of our community’s most urgent needs: affordable housing and housing for homeless youth,” said SHA Executive Director Andrew Lofton.”We are pleased to partner with the University to help make this important project a reality.”

The two organizations will launch an RFP/RFQ process later this year to identify a development partner to construct and potentially manage the building. Contingent on financing, the goal is to have the facility open by 2021.

The University already owns the property at 42nd and Roosevelt on which the building would be located.

This project represents the University’s ongoing commitment to support an inclusive and thriving University District and responds to the growing housing affordability crisis in the Seattle region.

 

Comments are closed.